Ethiopia #2: Over and Out

IMG-6477
My usual look, dirty but happy

I have spent a total of 5 days in Addis Ababa, mostly inside the camping area at Wim‘s Holland house. A lot of overlanders go there, since it has space to camp, space for the car, the rooms are cheap, and they serve good food. Exactly what I needed. As always, I took off very early in the morning after sunrise at around 6AM. The ride out of Addis was very peaceful and not much of a hassle. I planned to stay in a town 130km away from Addis Ababa, but as I arrived at noon already, I continued on. Following, the hassle started, people started to become more and more aggressive. I had kids throwing rocks right in front of me, usually they would throw them after I had passed them. Families sitting at the side of the road throwing stones, even adults grabbed fist-sized rocks and threw them at me. Once I passed two young adults, I greeted them kindly and as I passed one guy smashed a stick on my back. Of course, I stopped, and they ran off into the field, it just made me feel said. An adult couple stopped as well and tried to help me, but the guys were long gone. I continued and continued until the sun was almost gone. I did 230km on that day, I was so tired of all the harassment that I just wanted to leave. The hotel I got was nice and also the people I hung out that night were kind and I had good talks with them. Even they couldn’t explain why stuff like that happens to cyclists. The following day I left early again. The next town I passed was Shasharmane, famous for its living rastafari culture. I didn‘t see much of that as people were so aggressive. I cannot explain how it felt, it was just not welcoming. On that day I wanted to make it to Sodo, a 130km ride. After 75km I was mentally so down that I called my mom. Never miss out on a mom’s advice. I couldn‘t handle it anymore, I was so angry, sad and just didn‘t feel safe anymore. Whole groups of people tried to get a hold of me, followed me on their motorcycles, the stone throwing became so bad that I just didn‘t want to cycle anymore. Every kilometre was hell and I just wanted to get out as fast as possible. Luckily, I met some American tourists on the way whom I asked for help. They organized a transport for me to the next bigger city. That was the moment in which I decided that Ethiopia was over for me, but I still had 400km to cover. I had to change the bus 5 times until I finally reached the border of Kenya. Imagine having 6 bags with you, a bicycle and 30 people constantly around shouting at you. I had to do everything myself, carry the bicycle up and down from the bus roof, since they always asked for money and when I said no, they just left. It was very stressful, but I managed to get to the border within 2 days. The reason why I called my mom is that sometimes I am struggling to jump over my ego, giving up is not an option for me but my mom helped me to understand that I was not giving up on anything, that it was just smarter to take the bus, that I didn’t need to prove anything to anyone and that I would regret it if something bad had happened to me which could have possibly ended my trip altogether. That’s what a journey like this is here for. I can improve on myself, my character every day and try to learn learn learn. What is the point of doing something over such a long period of time if you don’t like it? I just wanted to move on so that I have more time to spend in a place I could enjoy.

IMG-6460
Chris and Sue, an English couple who travel the world with their Camper. They have already done whole West Africa and are now on their way up to Egypt. Their goal is to start their hot  air balloon in every country they travel to, and yes it is a real hot air balloon that carries people. Think about all the hustle they must have at the border with three big gas tanks in the back. I really love what they are doing.
IMG-6461
Cesar and Ida are a Polish couple who travel down to South Africa on a Motorcycle. I have met them 3 times on the road, in Khartoum, Gondar and a last time in Addis. Lucky for me they had troubles with their motorcycle and had to wait for spare parts 😀
IMG-6486
The usual travel place for my bike on a bus
IMG-6491
I always had to make sure myself that the bike is tightened correctly and that they don’t destroy things. So I rather did it myself.
IMG-6502
Please guys, be careful with the belt!!!
IMG_6474
A loooong day….
DSC_9224
The landscape again was really beautiful and it changed quite a bit from before Addis

DSC_9226

IMG-6488
Bus rides were really uncomfortable and the busses were usually very packed

 

DSC_9221
First wildlife I saw on the trip, unfortunately this Hyena had a worse day than I did

For some time now, Moyale had been experiencing regularly violent outbreaks. The area is known for tribal conflicts and I planned to get over to the Kenyan side as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, I couldn‘t pass the border in the evening anymore so I had to sleep on the Ethiopian side of Moyale, as the immigration dudes already left work at 5pm. Heavily armed man were walking around, some unrests occurred and big crowds of people gathered afterwards. This was the first time I didn‘t really feel comfortable. Usually, I never felt anything like this in all the other towns and cities I had stayed in. I got into the first hotel, organized a room, got out again to get water and bananas and went right inside the hotel area again. After sunset Moyale was like a ghost town, everything was completely shut down and I couldn‘t even leave the hotel anymore (not that I wanted to, I just checked). My night was peaceful, as always since I sleep with earplugs. I was the first person at Immigration in the morning, got the exit stamp from Ethiopia and went through „no-man’s-land” over to Kenya. As I went over, some Ethiopian guy didn‘t stop shouting at me, almost yelling. I didn‘t pay him any attention since guys have done this all the time. As I entered the Kenyan Immigration office, this guy showed up again, totally in rage, yelling at me, saying that I disrespect Kenyan orders and their law etc. For a moment I thought come on, please don’t make me stay here longer than I am supposed to. Then a really nice Kenyan military lady came, grabbed the man and took him out. As she returned, I asked her, what is if I leave and this guy is waiting outside? She just answered really cool, I locked him up in a cell for the day, you will be fine. This guy was totally drunk and high on Khat, he deserved it.

After I crossed the border I really felt at peace, no more youyouyou, no more moneymoneymoney and not a single rock! It’s crazy, 100% different. Kenya is such a beautiful, peaceful country, and the people are amazing, full of happiness & kindness. The level of English they speak is also exceptionally good and communication is great!

My interesting time in Ethiopia

By no means do I want to offend anyone by my post, but I try to write as accurate as possible on how I felt. Some unpleasant things can happen, but they do for sure not mean that I need to be quiet about it.
Yes, many people travel to Ethiopia, many people love it and have not experienced anything like I have. I can just say that there is a huge difference on traveling through Ethiopia by public transport, car, organized tours etc, and traveling through it on a bicycle. I can share some other stories with you from cyclists who also travelled through Ethiopia.

Link 1: You don’t cycle in Ethiopia

Link 2: Last days in Zombieland

Link 3: And they stoned me; The Joy of cycling in Ethiopia:

Link 4: Welcome to hell

Link 5: Stabbed in the back 


In any case, I would never dare to say that the whole country was bad, Ethiopia is beautiful, and the majority of the people is really nice. It is just that what happened to me cannot be just left away and I also want to share those experiences with you. However, some people ask me now: Lukas, will you continue to collect money for Ethiopia? I absolutely will continue to do so. You cannot throw all the people of a country in to the same basket. I have met wonderful people in Ethiopia as well, I visited places Green Ethiopia is active in and I have seen with my own eyes how much we can help to improve lives of less fortunate people. My bad experiences have nothing to do with my personal feelings towards Ethiopia and the people I can help. I still highly support the foundation Green Ethiopia and we should all take this as an example, not to judge a whole country just by single events and incidents that are occurring. Many Ethiopians couldn’t believe what has happened to me, and surely all of them have agreed that this cannot be tolerated.

 

Ethiopia – Statistics

Kilometres cycled: 1265

Days spent: 26

Nights wild camping: 0

Cost for food: 194$

Cost for sleeping: 172$

Average daily altitude climb: 1300 Meter

1FE882BC-973D-4A58-9609-9BB9318458B9

Deutsche Version: Die verschiedenen Gesichter Äthiopiens

DSC_9092
Auf dem Weg nach unten um den Nil zu überqueren

Hinweis: Maschinell übersetzt mit deepl.com

Äthiopien

So, bin ich endlich in Äthiopien eingetroffen, dem Land, über das ich am meisten gelesen habe, da viele Radfahrer vorher schlechte Erfahrungen gemacht haben und entweder durch das Land gerast sind oder den Bus genommen haben. Das problematischste Thema, das sie immer genannt haben, waren die Kinder entlang der Straße. Es ist bekannt, dass das Werfen von Steinen ein nationaler Sport ist, aber wenn man auf dem Fahrrad ist und Kinder anfangen, Steine auf einen zu werfen, kann jeder Tag eine mentale Herausforderung sein, ganz zu schweigen von der Gefahr, dass ein Stein einen tatsächlich trifft. Meine Meinung über das Radfahren in Äthiopien war bereits bei meiner Einreise voreingenommen, auch wenn ich es nicht wollte, konnte ich es nicht ändern. Ich hatte gerade zu viele schlechte Dinge über das Radfahren durch Äthiopien gelesen. Während ich die ersten Stunden durch Äthiopien radelte, ertappte ich mich als ängstlicher, vorsichtiger und weniger freundlich zu den Menschen als in anderen Ländern, in denen ich vorher war, und ich musste mir sagen, Lukas, tu das nicht, versuche das Beste daraus zu machen und versuche, die vielen positiven Dinge zu sehen, die dieses Land zu bieten hat. Ich bin immer noch dabei zu lernen, mit dem äthiopischen Volk auf dem Weg umzugehen, es wird sicherlich noch einige Zeit dauern, aber ich denke, dass dieser Prozess auch mentale Stärke für andere Situationen entwickeln wird, die in der Zukunft auftreten könnten. Nur um dir einen kurzen Einblick zu geben, womit ich jeden Tag zu tun habe. Es gibt ein ständiges Schreien nach mir, Kinder können Kilometer entfernt sein, sobald sie mich sehen, schreien sie, du, du, Geld, Geld, Geld. Wenn ich mit 5 bis 6 km/h bergauf fahre, folgen mir die Kinder und wiederholen einfach das YOU YOU MONEY MONEY immer wieder. Ich bin ein sehr ruhiger Kerl, aber stell dir vor, zehn Stunden am Tag unterwegs zu sein und dir das ständig anhören zu müssen. Es kann dich verrückt machen! Da ich es nicht ändern kann, versuche ich einfach, damit umzugehen, mir Geduld beizubringen und positiv darüber nachzudenken. Von dieser Erfahrung kann ich in Zukunft nur profitieren. Zum Glück habe ich bisher nicht so viele Steine auf mich geworfen bekommen, aber ich bin immer wirklich auf der Hut und wenn ich sehe, wie sie sich einen Stein schnappen, zeige ich auf sie, trete aufs Fahrrad und dann laufen sie normalerweise weg. Ich meine, es sind Kinder, man kann es ihnen nicht verübeln, es sind die Eltern, die ihren Job meiner Meinung nach ernster nehmen sollten. Es gibt auch Kinder, die versuchen, Sachen von der Außenseite meiner Taschen herauszunehmen, ja, ich bewahre mein Essen immer dort auf….. Ich muss nur ständig meine Umgebung beobachten, was sehr anstrengend sein kann. Ich hatte auch einige Erwachsene, die meine Taschen packten, während ich sie passierte, das kann super gefährlich sein. Normalerweise halte ich mein Fahrrad an, drehe mich um und sage es ihnen auf eine freundliche, aber ernsthafte Weise, damit aufzuhören. Ich glaube, dass mich nach Äthiopien nichts mehr vom Fahrrad holen kann, haha. Ich habe noch über 1500km vor mir, Äthiopien ist größer als ich dachte. Insgesamt sind es fast 2000 Kilometer durch das Land. Das ist ungefähr die gleiche Entfernung wie im Sudan, Äthiopien ist viel bergiger. Ich mache im Durchschnitt täglich mehr als 1000 Höhenmeter und die Straße wird an einem Punkt bis zu 3100 Meter über dem Meeresspiegel führen. Ich bin in Form meines Lebens, der Aufstieg stört mich nicht mehr. Es braucht einfach viel mehr Zeit als im flachen Gelände, also muss ich meine Tagesetappen anpassen.

DSC_8855
Ich durfte für das Äthipische Fernsehen ein Interview geben
DSC_8999
Überall hat es Leute. Von der Bevölkerung her ist Äthipien das grösste, Landumschlossene Land weltweit
DSC_8919
Die Blue Nile Falls in Bahir Dar
img_5809
Zwischenverpflegung, welche von lokalen Kindern am Strassenrand zubereitet wird
DSC_8303
Frauen tragen diese Wassertanks täglich Kilometer weit. Im Alter von etwa 8 Jahren müssen Mädchen anfangen das gleiche zu machen
DSC_8245
Die Felder werden gepflügt wie in Europa vor 100 Jahren
DSC_8828
Verschiedenste Sachen werden täglich auf dem Kopf transportiert, wie hier diese Hüner welche zum Metzger gebracht werden

DSC_8362DSC_8340DSC_8328DSC_8914

DSC_8335
Portrait Bilder von Debarak

 

5 Tage, 550km und 7500 Höhenmeter später

Dieser Beitrag wurde eine Woche später geschrieben, und ich hatte es einfach satt, in diesem Land Rad zu fahren:

Im Ernst, ich habe das noch nie erlebt. Äthiopien ist wie ein Dorf, und es gibt überall Menschen! Das sollte keineswegs ein negativer Beitrag sein, aber die Schikanen, mit denen ich den ganzen Tag zu tun habe, sind absolut verrückt und traurig. Äthiopien hat eine so verrückte Bettelkultur entwickelt, die mich verrückt macht, während ich jeden Tag für mehr als 10 Stunden unterwegs bin. Ich weiß, dass sie arm sind, aber im Ernst, ich war in vielen armen Ländern, und was die Äthiopier tun, ist meiner Meinung nach absolut respektlos! Es vergeht keine Minute, in der mich nicht jemand anschreit, vom Baby bis zum Großelternteil, nur jeder bittet immer um Geld! Es geht weiter…. die Steine… es ist sooo gefährlich, den ganzen Tag von Steinen getroffen zu werden. Normalerweise, wenn ich getroffen werde, zucke ich zusammen und drehe mich um, was ist, wenn ich für eine Sekunde den Überblick verliere und ein LKW von hinten kommt. Ich will nicht einmal an dieses Szenario denken. Ich bekomme den ganzen Tag lang Schreie und Pfiffe, es macht mir nichts aus, wenn sie mich mit “Ausländer” anschreien, aber sie tun es so aggressiv, dass es sooo ärgerlich wird. Ich fühle mich wie ein Hund behandelt. Wann immer ich durch ein Dorf fahre, versuchen Leute, Sachen aus meinen Außenbeuteln zu nehmen, sie versuchen, mich aufzuhalten, indem sie einfach meinen Arm oder meine Taschen greifen. Im Ernst, das Land und seine Natur sind atemberaubend, aber es war die bisher schlechteste Erfahrung in meinem Leben, es zu durchfahren. Ich bin in keinem fremden Land so behandelt worden, und es gibt noch 900 Kilometer bis Kenia. Bitte wünsche mir Glück und viel Geduld, ich hoffe, ich brauche danach keinen Psychiater.

DSC_9113
Die Nil Schlucht

DSC_9121

DSC_9048
Zum Glück ist der Besatzung nichts passiert, welche links am Bildrand auf ein “Taxi” wartet. Solche Unfälle sehe ich täglich
DSC_9124
Atemberaubende Aussichten
DSC_9012
Junge Mädchen mit schwerer Last. Alles schwere ist eigentlich von den Frauen getragen…
DSC_9009
Das Outfit von Hirten ist zum Teil ziemlich elegant!
DSC_9007
Ich glaube nicht dass ich mit seiner Geste einverstanden bin, was der Transport der Tiere angeht. Diese Armen Schafe

DSC_8950

DSC_8986
Will jemand ein Kleid?
DSC_8985
Äthiopien ist sehr hügelig, aber dafür wunderschön landschaftlich gesehen
DSC_9144
Nur ein paar Baboons beim überqueren der Strasse
DSC_8939
Scheint so als würden Männer die körperlich einfachere Arbeit erledigen

Internationale Hilfe – Einige mögliche Erklärungen für das, was ich erlebt habe.

Das liegt nur an meiner Meinung und an dem, was ich während meiner Zeit in diesem Land gesehen habe. Äthiopien steht seit langem auf der Liste der ärmsten Länder, sie hatten in den letzten 50 Jahren mit schweren Hungersnöten zu kämpfen. In der Hungersnot von 1983-1985 starben mehr als 400.000 Menschen. Ich glaube, dass Äthiopien seither von internationalen Hilfsorganisationen und Ländern überrannt wurde, die ihre Unterstützung zeigten. Fast jede Schule, die ich besuche, wurde von einer ausländischen Organisation gebaut, alle Wasserstationen werden von der Europäischen Union und anderen Organisationen gespendet. Alle Straßen werden entweder von China oder Japan gebaut, und ich sehe täglich so viele Autos, die von USaid, UKaid, Japaneseaid gespendet wurden, und die Liste geht weiter. Wie wäre es mit dem Aufwachsen in einem Land, in dem fast alles von einem anderen Land gefördert wird? Äthiopien hat sich daran gewöhnt, alles zu bekommen. Meiner Meinung nach weiß Äthiopien, wie man den Fisch, den es erhalten hat, spannt, aber es muss lernen, wie man ihn fängt, und das wird die größte Herausforderung für Äthiopien in den kommenden Jahren sein. Sie müssen weniger abhängig von der ihnen gerade übergebenen Auslandshilfe werden. Nun könnte man sagen ohhhh Lukas, warum unterstützt du also eine Organisation, die Hilfe für Äthiopien leistet? Die Erklärung ist einfach: Im Grünen Äthiopien geht es nicht um Hilfe, sondern um die Unterstützung der Selbstentfaltung, angefangen bei der Aufforstung bis hin zur Stärkung der Menschen zur nachhaltigen Verbesserung ihrer Lebenssituation. Ich bin fest davon überzeugt, dass dies der Schlüssel zur Entwicklung ist, denn Hilfe kann nicht nur gewährt werden, sie muss von den Menschen selbst gestärkt werden, sie müssen lernen, wie man Fische fängt!

Die Regenzeit ist vorbei

Die Regenzeit dauert etwa 3 Monate und mein Timing ist einfach toll, sie endet normalerweise im September. Jetzt ist alles so grün, die Blumen sind offen, und die Farbenvielfalt ist einfach atemberaubend. Ein paar kostenlose Ratschläge: Wenn du dieses schöne Land besuchen möchtest, mach es nach der Regenzeit! Ein weiteres Highlight sind die Vögel. Ich habe noch nie in meinem Leben eine so große Auswahl an bunten Vögeln gesehen, und wenn es nicht die ganze Zeit die YOUYOUYOUYOU geben würde, würde es ein riesiges Konzert von all den singenden Vögeln geben.

DSC_8205DSC_8213DSC_8751

DSC_8787
Viele Leute tragen Badeschuhe. Diese kosten nur etwa 2$, halten dafür auch nur etwa 2 Monate…

3 Tage Wanderung in den Simien Bergen

Viele Leute sagten mir, wenn es eine Sache gibt, die ich in Äthiopien tun sollte, dann ist es die Wanderung auf die Simienberge. Ich kam an einem Donnerstag in Gondar an, habe in den letzten 8 Tagen nichts anderes getan als Radfahren, und die Tour begann sofort am Freitag. Es hat mich nicht gestört, aber ich habe mir einfach gesagt, dass ich bald nach meiner Rückkehr eine ernsthafte Pause brauche. Die 3-tägige Wanderung umfasste einen Reiseleiter, einen Späher, zwei Köche, das gesamte Essen und die Campingausrüstung. Da ich sowieso alles bei mir hatte, brachte ich meine eigene Ausrüstung mit. Das war eine weise Entscheidung; die meisten Menschen froren nachts und ihr Zelt wurde wegen der starken Winde am Morgen fast weggeblasen. Ich schlief wie ein Baby und mein Zelt war stabil wie ein Fels. Von Gondar aus fuhr uns ein Minivan nach Debarak, wo wir in den Nationalpark eintraten. Ich hatte überhaupt keine Erwartungen, wusste nicht, welche Tiere zu erwarten sind und wie die Landschaft aussehen wird. Ich liebe es, es auf diese Weise zu tun, Dinge ohne jegliche Erwartungen zu tun, also werde ich überhaupt nicht enttäuscht sein. Normalerweise erweist es sich ohnehin als großartig, so wie es diesmal auch der Fall war. Wir wanderten insgesamt etwa sechs bis sieben Stunden täglich, kletterten auf Berge, die 4070 und 4400 Meter über dem Meeresspiegel lagen. Der höhere ist der zweithöchste Punkt Äthiopiens und die Aussicht dort oben war spektakulär. Ich denke, die Bilder werden für sich selbst sprechen, es waren drei tolle Tage und ich würde es definitiv wieder tun.

DSC_8457
Gelada Baboons im Simien National Park

DSC_8438

DSC_8621
Manchmal ging es bis zu 1000 Meter lochabwärts

DSC_8634DSC_8644DSC_8668DSC_8572DSC_8603DSC_8528DSC_8519DSC_8507DSC_8535DSC_8544

DSC_8394
Wir mussten einen Scout zu unserem Schutz dabei haben… naja, wie viel davon geldmacherei ist kann man sich ja bei den landschaftlichen Bildern selber vorstellen
IMG_5932
Ich habe den zweit höchsten Berg Äthiopiens erklummen, welcher 4,400 Meter hoch ist

Lebensmittel

Da Äthiopien früher von den Italienern “kolonisiert” wurde (nur 4 Jahre), findet man überall Spaghetti. Die Kellnerin sieht normalerweise verwirrt aus, wenn ich zwei Mahlzeiten bestelle, aber ich denke, sobald sie merkt, dass ich jeden Tag viel trainiere, macht es auch Sinn für sie. Ich bin kein großer Fan der traditionellen äthiopischen Küche, da sie meist scharf ist, einen sauren Geschmack hat und viel rohes Fleisch beinhaltet. Ich litt an einer bakteriellen Infektion, die mich die ganze Nacht mit Durchfall und Erbrechen wachhielt, also versuche ich lieber, das sicherere Zeug zu essen, als herauszufinden, was die Einheimischen essen. Auf einer Alleinreise krank zu sein, ist meiner Meinung nach das Schlimmste, was passieren kann. Das ist normalerweise die Zeit, in der ich mein Zuhause am meisten vermisse. Ich hatte jetzt meine Ruhe in Bahir Dar, obwohl es wegen der Krankheit irgendwie erzwungen wurde, Bahir Dar ist ein wirklich netter Ort, um festzuhalten und es war schön, endlich wieder andere Reisende zu treffen.

IMG_6277
Doppelte Portionen
IMG_6223
Mein Frühstück und Mittagessen

Wildcamping in Äthiopien

Äthiopien scheint wie ein riesiges Dorf zu sein. Es gibt überall Menschen und ernsthaft keinen Platz für Privatsphäre. Ich mag es nicht, an einem beliebigen Ort zu campen, wenn Leute dich stören, und nachdem ich den ganzen Tag angeschrien und belästigt wurde, ist es auch schön, abends etwas Privatsphäre zu haben. In der Regel gibt es in jeder Kleinstadt ein Hotel. Sie liegen zwischen 2 und 4 Dollar und sehen entsprechend aus. Was ich normalerweise tue, um vor all den Moskitos und Bettwanzen sicher zu sein, baue ich mein Innenzelt auf dem Bett auf. Ich schlafe immer mit Ohrstöpseln, da die Äthiopier bis spät in die Nacht feiern und sie immer laut sind. Normalerweise werden die Orte, an denen ich schlafe, eher als Bordell genutzt, in dem sich junge Leute treffen, um ihren eigenen Raum für etwas Action zu haben.

IMG_6306

IMG_6280
So sieht es aus wenn ich mein zelt im innern des Hotels aufschlage

Alkohol, Prostitution, Khat & Glue schnüffeln Kinder

Als ich die Grenze vom Sudan nach Äthiopien überquerte, sah ich überall Bierwerbung. Als ich weiter durch die Stadt fuhr, erkannte ich viele Frauen in kurzen Röcken und Stripclubs. Seien wir ehrlich, ich glaube nicht, dass es die Äthiopier sind, die den ganzen Weg bis an die Grenze des Sudans reisen, um “Spaß” zu haben. Die Alkoholkultur ist riesig und ich sehe Männer, die entlang der Straße Bier trinken und schon früh am Morgen beginnen. Jedes Dorf, egal welcher Größe, verfügt über mindestens einen Pool, Tischfußball oder Tischtennistisch. Ich weiß wirklich nicht, was all diese jungen Männer den ganzen Tag machen, aber es scheint, dass die meisten von ihnen sich wirklich nicht um die Arbeit kümmern. Ich habe schon einmal von Radfahrern gehört, dass sie Äthiopien Zombieland nennen. Ich kann wirklich verstehen, warum jetzt. Junge Männer laufen einfach auf mich zu, wenn ich durch ein Dorf fahre, haben riesige rote Augen und stolpern herum und reden über seltsame Dinge. Viele äthiopische Männer sind süchtig nach Khat, einer lokal angebauten Pflanze, die dich high macht. Wie Wikipedia es ausdrückt: Khat ist eine blühende Pflanze, die am Horn von Afrika und auf der Arabischen Halbinsel heimisch ist. Khat enthält das Alkaloidkathinon, ein Stimulans, das Aufregung, Appetitlosigkeit und Euphorie verursachen soll. Unter den Gemeinschaften aus den Gebieten, in denen die Pflanze heimisch ist, hat Khat-Kauen eine Geschichte als sozialer Brauch, der Jahrtausende zurückreicht, analog zur Verwendung von Kokablättern in Südamerika und Betelnüssen in Asien.

DSC_8273DSC_8271

DSC_9217
Man schaue links unten wie viele leere Äste schon da liegen. Diese Männer kauen den ganzen Tag nur Khat

Das erste Mal, dass ich auf dieser Reise wirklich traurig war, war, als ich in Addis ankam und durch die Stadt ging, um ein paar Lebensmittel einzukaufen. Es gibt so viele kleine Kinder, wirklich Kinder, die umherlaufen und Kleber aus abgeschnittenen PET-Flaschen schnüffeln. Sie kommen auf dich zu, können kaum noch geradeaus gehen und bitten dich um Essen oder Geld. Ich bin gerade sprachlos geworden, sie sind so jung, unschuldig und entschlossen, in sehr jungen Jahren zu sterben. Nach Angaben des African Child Information Hub leben in Addis Abeba bis zu 100.000 Straßenkinder, die leider am häufigsten an der Klebstoffschnüffelsucht.

DSC_9210
Ein Strassenkind in Addis Ababa am Leim schnüffeln

DSC_9203DSC_9206

 

Green Ethiopia

Ich habe bereits über 50 Postkarten geschrieben, mehr als 4000 Dollar an Spenden erhalten und die Nachricht seit fast 2 Jahren verbreitet. Schließlich hatte ich die Gelegenheit, ein Projekt von Green Ethiopia in Libokemkem, rund um die Stadt Addis Zemen, zu besuchen. Ich verbrachte über 5 Stunden in der lokalen Gemeinde, wanderte Hügel hinauf, durch Wälder und sprach mit den Einheimischen über ihre Arbeit. Es ist beeindruckend zu sehen, wie sehr sich die Landschaft verändert hat. Sooooo wurden viele Bäume gepflanzt und die Hügel sind jetzt terrassenförmig angelegt, so dass das Land grün und fruchtbar ist. Dies alles wird von der lokalen Gemeinschaft durchgeführt. Ich bin super glücklich, mit Green Ethiopia zusammengearbeitet zu haben und freue mich darauf, viele weitere Postkarten für jede Spende zu schreiben! Für jeden Dollar können mindestens 5 Bäume gepflanzt werden, schließe dich allen anderen Spendern an und helfe, Äthiopien grüner zu machen!

DSC_8805

DSC_8820
Hier werden die Stecklinge herangezüchtet. Wie ich es verstanden habe wird dies von den lokalen Kindern gemacht, welche diese dann an Green Ethiopia verkaufen. Dabei lernen sie sehr viel über die Pflanzen und deren Eigenschaften
DSC_8747
Im Innern eines Hauses
DSC_8749
Eine Frau am Injera machen
DSC_8737
Diese Pflanzen sind erst ein Jahr alt, das Geheimniss hinter dem starken Wachstum ist der anliegende Kuhstall, welcher den Dünger liefert
DSC_8725
Der Priester, welcher das zu erntende Land unter der dörflichen Bevölkerung verteilt

DSC_8812

 

Hinweis: Maschinell übersetzt mit deepl.com

Deutsche Version: Von Kahrtoum zur Äthiopischen Grenze, meine letzten Tage im Sudan

Hinweis: Maschinell übersetzt mit deepl.com

img_5782
Mein erster platter Reifen nach 5,500 km

Von Khartum, der Hauptstadt des Sudans, hatte ich noch etwa 550 Kilometer bis zur Grenze zu Äthiopien. Ich beschloss, einen kleinen Umweg zu machen, um mich von der belebten Hauptstraße fernzuhalten. Ich hatte die Hauptstraßen satt. Während den drei Tagen von Atbara nach Khartum stand ich mehrmals dem Tod gegenüber. Bus- und Lkw-Fahrer wollten nicht hinter mir anhalten, wenn ein anderes Fahrzeug auf mich zukam. Beim Vorbeifahren schoben sie mich einfach von der Straße und ich war manchmal kurz davor, von meinem Fahrrad zu fallen. Ich fing an, jedes Mal, wenn sich mir ein Lastwagen von hinten näherte, buchstäblich ein Handzeichen zu machen und ihnen zu zeigen, dass sie aufpassen sollen. Es funktionierte die meiste Zeit und ich war einfach wirklich glücklich, endlich Khartum zu erreichen. Die Straße, die ich in Richtung Al Quadrif nahm, befand sich also auf der anderen Seite des Nils, und ich fand sie sehr friedlich und mit wenig Verkehr.

DSC_7760

DSC_7906
Nach starken Regenfällen sind zwischenzeitlich viele Dörfer überschwemmt
DSC_7804
Ein typisches Dorf
DSC_7742
Das nächste Dorf ist etwa 150km weit weg, man sollte sich mal vorstellen hier zu leben

DSC_7797

img_5598
So schöne Mittagspausen hatte ich selten, aber ab und zu hatte ich Glück. So konnte ich locker 2-3h schlafen

Die Umgebung begann sich schnell zu verändern. Je näher ich an die Grenze kam, desto grüner wurde sie. Ich plante, die 550 km in 5 Tage aufzuteilen, in “Hotels” in den größeren Städten Wad Madani und Al Quadrif zu übernachten, und den Rest der Tage würde ich irgendwo neben der Straße schlafen. Wie du auf den Bildern sehen kannst, habe ich einige schöne Campingplätze gefunden, ganz allein, bedeckt mit Bäumen. Obwohl einige Einheimische mich bemerkt haben, habe ich mich beim Wildcamping im Sudan nie in irgendeiner Weise unsicher gefühlt. Während meiner 23 Tage im Sudan habe ich nur 50 Dollar für die Unterkunft ausgegeben, also habe ich die meiste Zeit in meinem Zelt geschlafen. Die Hotels, die ich hatte, waren schmutzig und wirklich nur gut für die Nacht, um sich mit Wasser und Essen zu versorgen. Im Sudan habe ich durchschnittlich 4 bis 5 Dollar für ein Zimmer pro Nacht bezahlt. Wenn ich in einem Hotel übernachtete, nahm ich immer mein Fahrrad mit in das Zimmer. Manchmal konnte ich mich kaum in meinem eigenen Zimmer bewegen, aber zumindest wusste ich, dass das Fahrrad sicher ist. Es gibt sicher teurere Zimmer, die ich nehmen könnte, aber was soll’s, ich würde dieses Geld lieber für andere Aktivitäten als für den Schlaf verwenden, und die lustigen Dinge passieren, wenn man aus seiner Komfortzone herauskommt. Aufwachen mit einer Ratte im Zimmer oder Durchfall die ganze Nacht über, wenn das Badezimmer 100 Meter von der Schlafstätte entfernt ist, sind Geschichten, die du nicht so schnell vergessen wirst.

img_5758
Schön gedeckt von der Strasse und endlich wieder mit festem Untergrund um mein Zelt auf zu stellen

img_5723

img_5756
Mein Kampingstuhl wird rege gebraucht!

 

Bevölkerungsdichte

Das Leben entlang der Straße wurde immer belebter, als ich weitermachte. Der Agrarsektor ist im Osten des Sudan dominanter als im Rest der von mir eingeschlagenen Route. Die Landschaft ist sehr grün und es gibt viele Tiere, die überall grasen. An einem Tag zwischen Khartum und dem Wad Madani gab es überall Menschen, Stadt für Stadt, also beschloss ich, eines Nachts an einem Polizeikontrollpunkt zu bleiben. Sie sind sicher und die Polizisten im Sudan tragen überraschenderweise nicht einmal eine Waffe. Sie boten mir eine Menge heiße Milch und anderes Essen an.

img_5605
Als ich die Nacht beim Polizei-Checkpoint verbrachte
DSC_8080
Täglicher Verkehr
DSC_8070
Der arme Esel mit der Zunge draussen… was ist wohl zu schwer 😀

DSC_8055DSC_8039DSC_7916

Sudanesische Gastfreundschaft

Die Gastfreundschaft hielt während meiner Reise durch den Sudan an. Auf stündlicher Basis luden mich Leute zu Kaffee und Tee ein, was ich meistens, offen gesagt, ablehnte, da ich viele Kilometer zurücklegen musste, und ich kann nicht den ganzen Tag Tee trinken. Allerdings habe ich nie ein Lebensmittelangebot abgelehnt, haha, also wurde ich zufällig von einem jungen Mann eingeladen, während ich eine Wasserpause machte. Ich dachte zuerst, er wollte etwas von mir, aber da ich an diesem Tag bereits mehr als 3/4 meiner geplanten Route gemacht hatte, folgte ich ihm einfach. Da es Freitag (der heilige Tag der Muslime) war, wurde ich zu einem riesigen Frühstück eingeladen, das einfach köstlich war. Es waren nur Männer im Raum, im Alter von 5 bis 27 Jahren. Ein Typ sprach fließend Englisch und es fühlte sich gut an, ein normales Gespräch zu führen. Nachdem er über viele kulturelle Unterschiede zwischen dem Sudan und der Schweiz gesprochen hatte, bat er mich freundlicherweise, meine Kleider auszuziehen, sie wollten mich nackt sehen. Ich lachte nur und zeigte ihnen meinen Oberkörper. Ich lachte noch mehr, als sie mehr sehen wollten, aber ich lehnte dann offen gesagt ab, und sie akzeptierten es. Später fragte ich mich, warum sie mich völlig nackt sehen wollten, liegt es an der Hautfarbe? oder wollten sie sehen, ob mein Penis beschnitten ist? Ich weiß es wirklich nicht, ich fand es einfach lustig, dass sie völlig gegen Homosexualität sind und mich dennoch baten, meine Kleider vor ihnen auszuziehen.

img_5619
Typisches sudanesisches Frühstück

img_5626

Die afrikanische Art Dinge zu tun

Ich liebe es einfach, Zeit in einem Dorf oder einer Stadt zu verbringen, irgendwo zu sitzen und den Menschen bei ihren täglichen Geschäften zuzusehen. Es gibt spezielle Ladestationen, an denen etwa 50 Telefone gleichzeitig aufgeladen werden. In Afrika haben mehr Menschen Zugang zum Internet als zu Strom. Was mir auch klar wurde, ist, dass die Menschen im Sudan wirklich keine Wartung ihrer Ausrüstung durchführen. Die Lastwagen, Busse, Tuctuc’s, wie auch immer man es nennt, sie benutzen es einfach, bis es nicht mehr funktioniert. Im Ernst, sie haben kein Profil mehr auf ihrem Reifen, sie tauschen keinen Reifen aus, bis er explodiert und vollständig von der Felge abgerissen wird, was manchmal noch weitere Schäden an der Karosserie des Fahrzeugs verursacht. In diesem Teil werde ich einige Bilder posten, die so typisch für die afrikanische Art, Dinge zu tun, sind.

DSC_7972

DSC_8010
Vorallem in ländlichen Regionen werden ausschliesslich Esel als Fortbewegungsmittel gebraucht
img_5753
Ein oft gesehenes Bild in Afrika, Lastwagen bis zum letzten Platz gefüllt mit Menschen
img_5649
Sauberkeit ist gut, aber ich weis ja nicht wie gut es für das Grundwasser ist…
DSC_7889
TucTuc Waschanlage

img_5690

img_5698
Der Handy Doktor
img_5715
Explodierte Reifen überall… Die Ersatzreifen sehen meist fast noch schlimmer aus als die gebrauchten
DSC_7962
Typisch für Afrika, Frauen laufen täglich Kilometer weit um Sachen zu transportieren

Das äthiopische Visum

Da ich nicht mit dem Flugzeug nach Äthiopien kam, war ich verpflichtet, das Visum bei der äthiopischen Botschaft in Khartum zu beantragen. Ich kam an einem Freitag in Khartum an, und da das arabische Wochenende von Freitag bis Samstag ist, musste ich bis Sonntag warten, um zur Botschaft zu gehen. Ein Freund sagte mir, ich solle sehr früh dorthin gehen. Die Botschaft öffnet um 8:30 Uhr und ich kam dort um 06:00 Uhr an. Überraschenderweise war ich nicht der Erste, da ich mich beim “Wachmann” anmelden musste, wurde mir die Nummer 47 zugewiesen. Der ganze Prozess war so unorganisiert, dass niemand wirklich eine Ahnung hatte, was los war. Es gab etwa 4 verschiedene Linien, jeder schrie, hielt verschiedene Papiere in der Hand und die Botschaftsleute, die dafür zuständig waren, Menschen hereinzulassen, nutzten ihre situative Kraft und handelten wirklich arrogant. Anscheinend kamen die ersten, die sie hereingelassen haben, bereits 5 Tage zuvor in die Botschaft, und da sie nur 100 Personen pro Tag hereingelassen haben, war der ganze Prozess völlig verzögert. Um 11:00 Uhr machte uns ein Mann endlich klar, dass wir heute kein Visum bekommen würden, und er legte jedes unserer Visaformulare wieder eine Nummer und ein Datum auf, an dem wir unseren Visumstermin haben werden. Ich wurde am Mittwoch mit der Nummer eins beauftragt. Also musste ich drei Tage warten, um wieder zur Botschaft zu gehen. Da ich Zeit hatte und das Visum wirklich wollte, kam ich an diesem Mittwoch um 06:00 Uhr wieder an. Gegen 10:00 Uhr durfte ich hineingehen, und ich hatte wirklich Glück, denn die Nummer, der ich früher zugewiesen wurde, spielte keine Rolle. Es gab Leute, die sogar 2 Tage vor mir einen Termin hatten und es wieder nicht geschafft haben, hineingelassen zu werden. Der ganze Prozess ist einfach soooo ungeordnet, und als Botschaftsmitarbeiter, wie kann man damit jeden Tag umgehen, ohne es zu ändern? Ich musste weitere 6 Stunden drinnen warten, bis ich endlich mein dreimonatiges Visum bekam, das mich 60$ kostete.

Mein Kampf mit den Postkarten

Auf dem ganzen Weg nach unten im Sudan habe ich versucht, eine Poststelle zu finden, aber die Antwort war immer nein, es gibt keine im Sudan. Ich habe überall Leute gefragt und sogar Expats, die seit Jahren in Khartum leben, haben mir gesagt, dass sie nirgendwo von einer Post gehört haben. Als ich maps.me überprüfte, stand auf dem Schild Postamt Khartum. Nun, warum versuchen wir es nicht mal? Da ich für jede Spende, die ich erhalte, eine Postkarte schreibe und die meisten Leute eine Postkarte aus dem Sudan wollen, musste ich sie ausprobieren. Ich wollte nicht 20 Leute im Stich lassen. Als ich an dem Ort ankam, ja, es gab ein großes Gebäude, das aussah wie eine Post, aber ein Typ sagte mir, dass es sich um ein verlassenes Gebäude aus der britischen Kolonialzeit handelt. Ok, also habe ich mich einfach bei den Einheimischen erkundigt, wo es eine Post gibt. Wie immer hatte niemand eine Ahnung, aber plötzlich schien ein Mann zu wissen, wonach ich suche, hielt einen Kleinbus an und sagte dem Fahrer, wo er mich absetzen sollte. Tadaaa, nach einem kurzen Spaziergang kam ich wirklich an etwas, das aussah wie eine Poststelle. Das Durcheinander im Inneren war gross, aber es sah immer noch so aus, als wären sie unter Kontrolle des Durcheinanders. Ich habe überprüft, ob sie Postkarten und den Preis schicken. So fand ich endlich eine Poststelle, aber was ist mit Postkarten? Der Sudan ist kein typisches Reiseziel, also wo findet man Postkarten? Der Kampf war echt! Ich habe bereits Pläne gemacht, Bilder auszudrucken und in einem Umschlag zu versenden. Als ich aus dem SudaPost-Büro ging, sah mich ein Typ mit einem kleinen Straßenladen an und sagte: Postkarten?! Ich konnte mein Lachen nicht zurückhalten, ich war so verdammt, du bist mein Mann. Die Postkarten, die er hatte, waren mindestens 20 Jahre alt, aber meiner Meinung nach waren sie toll, auch wenn sie überhaupt nicht schön aussahen, es sind Postkarten aus dem Sudan! Ich meine, wer hat schon mal eine Postkarte aus dem Sudan erhalten?! Was für ein Spielmacher, ich habe es geschafft, eine Poststelle und Postkarten zu finden! Als ich sie alle zur Post brachte, sorgte ich wirklich dafür, dass die Frauen am Schalter auf meine Seite kamen. Ich würde es nicht Flirten nennen, aber wie ich ihnen sagte, sind all diese Karten für meine Frau, Kinder und Freunde, ihr Herz schien wirklich zu schmelzen und ich war mir ziemlich sicher, dass sie sich gut um die Karten kümmern werden. Ich habe alle Briefmarken selbst auf jede Karte gestempelt und selbst abgestempelt, um sicherzustellen, dass sie nicht nur die Briefmarken nach meiner Abreise wieder abnehmen. Es dauerte genau 18 Tage, bis die ersten Postkarten ankamen, und ich glaube, dass inzwischen alle 20 Karten den Weg zum Empfänger gefunden haben. Wie toll ist das? Es dauerte 6 Wochen, bis Postkarten aus Italien nach Hause kamen, die 200 km vor der Schweizer Grenze verschickt wurden!

img_5560
Der grosse Tag beim Postbureau
img_5559
Mein Postkarten Held

img_5570

Grenzübergang Sudan – Äthiopien

Grenzübergänge sind spannend, man betritt ein neues Land, eine andere Kultur. Sie sprechen eine andere Sprache, kleiden sich anders. Von einem Tag auf den anderen können sich die Dinge völlig ändern. Dennoch sind Grenzübergänge auch ein großes Problem. Die Leute versuchen immer, dich auszunutzen, sie wollen dein Geld tauschen, versuchen, dir mehr Geld für Essen in Rechnung zu stellen, versuchen dir zu helfen, Geld von einem Geldautomaten zu bekommen, sagen dir, wohin du gehen sollst, und es gibt etwa 10 Leute, die dich anschreien, wenn du woanders hingehst.

Ich übernachtete 50 km von der Grenze zwischen einigen Bäumen entfernt. Ich nahm es morgens locker, weil ich wusste, dass ich nur etwa 90 Kilometer mit wenig Höhenunterschied zurücklegen musste. Ich fuhr 2 km lang, als mir plötzlich klar wurde, dass ich meinen ersten Platten hatte, wuhuuu! Nach 5500 km, durch Dornbüsche, über Glasscherben und schreckliche Straßen zu fahren, ist das eine solide Leistung, würde ich sagen. Es dauerte etwa 30 Minuten, da ich es nicht eilig hatte und ich es lieber langsam und ruhig als zweimal tat. Ich tauschte den Schlauch aus und reparierte den defekten ein paar Tage später in einem Hotelzimmer, wo es nicht so staubig und voller Schmutz war.

An der Grenze angekommen, musste ich zum sudanesischen Einwanderungsamt gehen, um ein Formular auszufüllen, meinen Pass abstempeln zu lassen und ich war unterwegs, um die Brücke auf die andere Seite zu überqueren. Die sudanesischen Beamten an der Grenze versuchten, mein Gepäck zu kontrollieren. Ich tat so, als ob ich nicht verstanden hätte, was er tun wollte, und nach ein paar Sekunden winkte er mir einfach zu. Dann musste ich auf der anderen Seite genau den gleichen Prozess durchlaufen. Die Dame, die mein Gepäck überprüfen wollte, war etwas gespannter, um meine Sachen zu sehen. Sie checkte die ersten beiden Taschen vorne, aber dann wurde sie müde davon und ich überredete sie nicht weiterzumachen. Stellen Sie sich vor, es ist sooooo ärgerlich, wenn sie durch deine gesamte Ausrüstung schauen wollen. Es ist so viel und ich muss alle Taschen vom Fahrrad nehmen. Auch die Passkontrolle ist ärgerlich. Einfach normal gekleidete Leute tauchten an der Seite des Rittes auf und forderten, meinen Pass zu sehen. Ja, sie könnten Polizisten sein, und wahrscheinlich sind sie es meistens, aber da ich es nicht wissen kann, gehe ich normalerweise einfach weiter, ohne ihnen etwas zu zeigen. Die meisten haben kein Auto, also konnten sie mir nicht einmal folgen.

Die Freundlichkeit der Fremden

Als ich an der Grenze ankam, hatte ich noch etwa 10$ in sudanesischen Pfund übrig. Wie üblich versuche ich, mein ganzes Geld loszuwerden, bevor ich die Grenze überschreite, da das Ändern es einen immer schlechter weglässt, als es von einem Geldautomaten zu bekommen. Viele Leute sagten mir, es sei kein Problem, Geld von einem Geldautomaten direkt nach der Grenze zu bekommen, also machte ich mir keine Sorgen um Geld. Da das Glück ganz und gar nicht auf meiner Seite war, war der einzige Geldautomat auf der anderen Seite der Grenze außer Betrieb und mir wurde gesagt, dass es 40 km weiter die Straße in der nächsten Stadt einen anderen internationalen Geldautomaten gibt. Ich verließ Metama sofort, da ich den Ärger, der da vor sich ging, nicht ertragen konnte. Kurz darauf sah ich zwei Überlandfahrer mit der schönen BMW 1200 GS und GSA auf mich zukommen. Ich streckte meine Hand aus, um ihnen zu signalisieren, anzuhalten. In diesen Gebieten trifft man nicht so viele Reisende auf der Straße, so dass es sich immer lohnt, zumindest ein kurzes Gespräch zu führen. Es stellte sich heraus, dass es sich um ein belgisches Paar auf Hochzeitsreise handelte, das von Südafrika bis nach Belgien reiste. Wenn es da draußen eine Frau gibt, die auch so eine Hochzeitsreise haben will, melde dich bitte bei mir! Sie nennen sich die Belgium Gravel Cats und sie können ihrer abenteuerlichen Reise hier folgen. Ich erzählte ihnen von meinem Pech an der Grenze mit dem Geldautomaten, und ohne zu zögern übergaben sie mir ihre restliche Birr, die etwa 12$ kostete, und eine SIM-Karte für Notfälle, da der nächste Telefonladen in Gondar, 200km entfernt, liegt. Mit dem Gesamtwert von 22$ Birr (Name der äthiopischen Währung) war es mir möglich, Gondar zu erreichen, wo ich wieder Geld abheben konnte. Ich hätte ohne ihre freundliche Geste überlebt, aber es machte meine kommenden drei Tage viel angenehmer und weniger stressig. Vielen Dank dafür! Die Freundlichkeit der Mitreisenden, besonders in Gebieten, in denen man nicht wirklich viele Überlandfahrer trifft, ist immer bemerkenswert und ich versuche wirklich, diesen Geist aufrechtzuerhalten.

Screenshot 2018-10-07 17.17.33
The Belgian Gravel Cats, Pieter and Eva

Sudan – Statistik

Kilometer: 1774

Verweildauer: 23 Tage

Nächte wildes Camping: 10

Kosten für Essen: 124$

Kosten für das Schlafen: 98$, inklusive zwei Übernachtungen für insgesamt 50$ (Geburtstagsgenuss)

Durchschnittlicher täglicher Wasserverbrauch: 12-14 Liter

Lieblingsessen: Die Sudanesen nennen es Sahan ful (ein Teller Bohnen) oder ful masri (ägyptische Bohnen). Es ist ein vegetarisches, proteinreiches Gericht, garniert mit frischen Zwiebeln, Tomaten, Rucola, Fetakäse, gekochten Eiern und Sesamöl. Es verursachte den einzigen Rückenwind, den ich im Sudan hatte, haha.

ebf6324a-c6ea-4d21-9ce7-6b1e501d31d0
Sieht nicht gut aus aber schmeckt umso besser!

Hinweis: Maschinell übersetzt mit deepl.com

The many faces of Ethiopia

DSC_9092
On the way down to cross the Nile, it took me 1 hour to get down, and 3.5 hours up again

Ethiopia

So, I have finally entered Ethiopia, the country I have most read about since a lot of cyclists had bad experiences before and either rushed through it or took the bus. The most problematic issue they always named were the kids along the road. It is known that throwing rocks is a national sport, but if you are on a bicycle and kids start to throw rocks at you, every day can be a mental challenge, not to speak of the danger of a rock actually hitting you. My opinion about cycling in Ethiopia was already biased when I entered the country, even if I didn’t want it I couldn’t change it. I had just read to many bad things about cycling through Ethiopia. While cycling the first couple of hours through Ethiopia, I caught myself as being more anxious, more careful and less friendly to people than in other countries I have been before, and I had to tell myself, Lukas, don’t do that, try to make the best out of it and try to see the many positive things this country has to offer. I am still in the process of learning to deal with the Ethiopian people along the road, it will take some more time for sure, but I think that process will also develop mental strength for other situations that might arise in the future. Just to give you a brief insight on what I have to deal with every day. There is a continuous shouting at me, kids can be kilometres away, as soon as they see me they shout YOU YOU YOU YOU, MONEY MONEY MONEY. When I climb hills at 5 to 6 km/h, kids follow me and just repeat the YOU YOU MONEY MONEY over and over again. I am a very calm guy but imagine being on the road for ten hours plus a day, having to continuously listen to that. It can drive you crazy! Since I can’t change it, I just try to deal with it, teaching myself patience and thinking about it in a positive way. I can only benefit from this experience in the future. Luckily, I did not get that many stones thrown at me so far, however, I am always really on the watch and if I see them grabbing a rock, I point at them, step of the bicycle and then they usually run away. I mean they are kids, you can’t blame them, it’s the parents who should take their job more seriously in my opinion. There are also kids trying to take stuff out from the outside of my bags, yes, I always keep my food there… I just constantly need to watch my surroundings which can be very tiring. I also had some adults grabbing my bags while I passed them, this can be super dangerous. I usually stop my bicycle, turn around and tell them in a kind but serious way to stop with that. I believe that after Ethiopia, nothing can bring me off my bicycle anymore haha. I still have over 1500km to go, Ethiopia is bigger than I thought. It is overall almost a 2000 kilometres ride through the country. That’s around the same distance as I did in Sudan, expect the fact that Ethiopia is so mountainous. I am doing on average more than 1000 metres of altitude daily and the road will go up to 3100 meters above sea level at one point. I am in the shape of my life, going uphill doesn’t bother me anymore. It just takes way more time than in the flat terrain, so I kind of need to adjust my daily stretches.

DSC_8855
When I was interviewed by the Ethiopian television. I hope I could make a statement for the parents to teach their kids not to throw any stones at cyclists anymore
DSC_8999
People just everywhere, population wise Ethiopia is the biggest landlocked country
DSC_8919
The Blue Nile Waterfall in Bahir Dar
img_5809
Little snack along the road, usually prepared by local kids
DSC_8303
Women carrying big water tanks every day for kilometres. Usually from the age of 8 to 10 the girls will start to do the same
DSC_8245
I haven’t seen any agricultural machines in use. Everything is done like 100 years ago in Europe.
DSC_8828
Various things are carried on the head, like this woman here carrying the chickens to the butcher

DSC_8362DSC_8340DSC_8328

DSC_8913

DSC_8335
Some portrait pictures from Debarak

5 days, 550km and 7500 meters of altitude later

This post was written a week of cycling later, and I just got so tired of cycling in this country:

Seriously, I have not experienced this before. Ethiopia is like one village, and there is people EVERYWHERE! This should by no means be a negative post, but the harassment I have to deal with during the whole day is absolutely insane and sad. Ethiopia has developed such a crazy begging culture that is driving me nuts while being on the road for 10 hours+ every day. I know they are poor, but seriously I have been to many poor countries and what Ethiopien people do is in my opinion absolutely disrespectful! There is not one minute passing by that someone doesn‘t shout MONEY MONEY MONEY at me, from babies up to grandparents, just everyone is always asking for money! It continues… the stones… it is sooo dangerous being hit by stones all day long. Usually when I get hit I flinch and turn around, what is if I lose sight for one second and a truck is coming from behind. I don‘t even want to think about that scenario. I get shout and whistled at all day long, I don‘t mind when they shout „foreigner“ at me, but they do it in such an aggressive way that it becomes sooo annoying. I feel being treated like a dog. Whenever I pass a village there is people trying to take stuff out of my outside bags, they try to stop me by just grabbing my arm or my bags. Seriously, the country and its nature is breathtaking, but to cycle through it has been the worst experience so far in my life. I have never been treated like that in any foreign country, and there is still 900km to cycle until Kenya. Please wish me luck and a lot of patience, I hope I do not need a psychiatric doctor afterwords.

DSC_9113
On the way down to cross the Nile

DSC_9121

DSC_9048
Luckily nothing happens, you can see all of the crew to the left. However, I just ask myself how the driver did it.
DSC_9124
Stunning views, This picture is taken 2400 Meter above sea level
DSC_9012
Young girls carrying heavy loads. All the heavy stuff is carried by femals
DSC_9009
The shepherd dress really nice, with jackets, dressshirts and hats
DSC_9007
I don’t really agree with his gesture, but that’s just the way the transport the sheep around Ethiopia

DSC_8950

DSC_8986
Anyone wants a dress?
DSC_8985
Ethiopia is very hilly but the views are just amazing
DSC_9144
Just Baboons crossing the road
DSC_8939
Seems like men are doing the easy work

 

International Aid – Some possible explanations of what I have experienced

This is just based on my opinion and of what I have seen during my time spent in this country. Ethiopia has been on the list of poorest countries for a long time, they have battled severe famines in the last 50 years. In the famine from 1983 -1985 more than 400,000 people died. I believe since then, Ethiopia has been overrun by international aid organizations and countries who showed their support. Almost every school I pass is built by a foreign organization, all the water stations are donated by the European Union and other organizations. All the roads are either built by China or Japan, and I see so many cars on a daily basis that have been donated by USaid, UKaid, Japaneseaid and the list goes on. What about growing up in a country where almost everything has been sponsored by a foreign country? Ethiopia has become used to be handed everything. In my opinion Ethiopia knows how to cock the fish they have received, but they need to learn how to catch it, and this will be the biggest challenge for Ethiopia in the upcoming years. They need to become less dependent on foreign aid just handed over to them. Now you might say ohhh Lukas so why do you support an organization that delivers aid to Ethiopia? The explanation is simple, Green Ethiopia is not about delivering aid, instead it is about supporting self development, starting with afforestation and ending with people being empowered to sustainably improve their living situation. I strongly believe that is the key for development, aid cannot just be handed over, it needs to be empowered by the people itself, they need to learn how to catch the fish!

Rain season is over 

The rain season lasts for about 3 months and my timing is just great, it usually ends in September. Everything now is so green, flowers are open, and the diversity of colours is just breath-taking. Some free advice: If you want to visit this beautiful country, do it after rain season! Another highlight are the birds. I have never seen such a variety of colourful birds in my life, and if there wouldn’t be the YOUYOUYOU all the time, there would be a huge concert going on from all the singing birds.

DSC_8205DSC_8213DSC_8751

DSC_8787
A lot of people wear bathing slippers that they can cheaply buy for around 2 dollars. As cheap as they are, they don’t last very long. Surprisingly, Ethiopia is very clean compared to Sudan and Egypt, you barely see any plastic laying around

3 days hike in the Simien mountains

Many people told me that if there is one thing I should do whilst in Ethiopia it is to hike the simien mountains. I arrived in Gondar on a Thursday, didn’t do anything else than cycling for the last 8 days, and the tour started on Friday right away. It didn’t bother me, but I just told myself that I will need a serious break soon after I get back. The 3 days hiking included a guide, a scout, two cooks, all the food and camping equipment. Since I had everything with me anyway, I brought all my own equipment. This was a wise decision; most people were freezing at night and their tent was almost blown off because of the strong winds in the morning. I slept like a baby and my tent was stable as a rock. From Gondar a minivan drove us up to Debarak, where we entered the national park. I did not have any expectations at all, didn’t know what animals to expect and how the landscape will look like. I love doing it this way, doing stuff with no expectations whatsoever so I will not be disappointed at all. It usually turns out to be great anyway, so did it this time as well. We hiked a total of around six to seven hours daily, climbed up to mountains that were 4070 and 4400 meters above sea level. The later one is the second highest point in Ethiopia and the view up there was spectacular. I think the pictures will speak for itself, it was just an amazing three days and I would definitely do it again.

DSC_8457
Gelada Baboons in the Simien Mountains. They are really peaceful and let you get very close

DSC_8438

DSC_8621
Stunning cliffs, sometimes more than 1000 meters steep

DSC_8634DSC_8644

DSC_8668
Spottet many Walias on the way up to the top

DSC_8572DSC_8603DSC_8528DSC_8519DSC_8507DSC_8535DSC_8544

DSC_8394
The scout we had to have with us for our own safety, haha!
IMG_5932
Climbed up the second highest mountain in Ethiopia, 4,400 meters above sea level

 

Food in Ethiopia

As Ethiopia used to be “colonized” (Only 4 years) by the Italians, one can find spaghetti everywhere. The waitress usually looks confused when I order two meals, but I think once she realizes I am doing a lot of exercising every day it also makes sense to her haha. I am not a big fan of the traditional Ethiopian food, since it is mostly spicy, has a sour taste and they eat a lot of raw meat. I was suffering from a bacterial infection, which kept me up all night with diarrhoea and vomiting, so I rather try to eat the safer stuff than trying out what the locals eat. Being sick on a solo travel is in my opinion the worst thing that can happen. That’s usually the time when I miss home the most. I had my rest now in Bahir Dar, even though it was kind of forced because of the illness, Bahir Dar is a really nice place to get stuck and it was nice to finally meet some other travelers again.

img_6277
Eating double portions
IMG_6223
This is how my usual breakfast and lunch looks like, bred, banana and chocolate

Wild camping in Ethiopia

Ethiopia seems to be like one huge village. There are people everywhere and seriously no space for any privacy. I don’t like camping at a random place when there are people bothering you, and after being shout at and harassed the whole day, it is also nice to have some privacy in the evening. There is usually a hotel in every little town. They range between 2 to 4 dollars and they look accordingly. What I usually do, to stay safe from all the mosquitos and bed bugs, I pitch my inner tent on the bed. I always sleep with earplugs, since Ethiopians party till late at night and they are always loud. Usually the places I sleep are more used as a brothel where young people meet to have their own room for some action.

IMG_6306

IMG_6280
This is how I pitched my tent inside the “hotel” rooms

Alcohol, Prostitution, Khat & Glue sniffing children

As soon as I crossed the border from Sudan to Ethiopia, I saw beer advertisements everywhere. When I continued further through the town, I recognized many women wearing short skirts as well as strip clubs. Let’s be honest, I don’t believe it’s the Ethiopians that travel all the way to the border of Sudan to have “fun”. The alcohol culture is huge and I see men drinking beer all along the road, starting already early in the morning. Every village, no matter the size, has at least one pool,  table soccer or pingpong table. I really don’t know what all these young men do all day long, but it seems like most of them really don’t care about work. I have heard from cyclists before that they call Ethiopia Zombie land. I can really understand why now. Young men just running up to me when I ride through a village, having huge red eyes and tumbling around talking weird stuff. Many Ethiopian men are addicted to Khat, a locally grown plant that makes you high. As Wikipedia puts it: Khat is a flowering plant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Khat contains the alkaloidcathinone, a stimulant, which is said to cause excitement, loss of appetite, and euphoria. Among communities from the areas where the plant is native, khat chewing has a history as a social custom dating back thousands of years analogous to the use of coca leaves in South America and betel nut in Asia.

DSC_8273DSC_8271

DSC_9217
This guys were already super high on Khat, look at all the empty straws

The first time I felt really sad on this trip was when I arrived in Addis and walked around town to do some groceries shopping. There are so many young kids, really kids, walking around totally high sniffing glue out of cut off PET bottles. They come up to you, can barely walk straight anymore and beg you for food or money. Just made me speechless, they are so young, innocent and determined to die at a very young age. According to the African Child Information Hub, there are as many as 100,000 street children living in Addis Ababa and sadly they are most often involved in the glue-sniffing practice.

DSC_9210
Addis street kid sniffing on glue
DSC_9203
The guy in the back is already flying high

DSC_9206

Green Ethiopia

I have written already over 50 postcards, received more than $4000 in donations and spread the word for almost 2 years now. Finally, I had the chance to visit a Green Ethiopia project in Libokemkem, around Addis Zemen town. I spent over 5 hours in the local community, walking up hills, through forests and talking to the local people about their work. It is impressive to see how much the landscape has changed. Sooooo many trees have been planted and the hills are now terraced so the land is green and fertile. This is all done by the local community. I am super happy to have partnered up with Green Ethiopia and I am looking forward to writing many more postcards for every donation I receive! For every dollar, at least 5 trees can be planted, join all the other donors and help to make Ethiopia greener, also during the dry season!

DSC_8805

DSC_8820
Where new seedlings are grown. As I understood it the seedlings are cared by the school children
DSC_8747
Inside a local house
DSC_8749
A woman preparing Injera, a sourdough-risen flatbread with a slightly spongy texture
DSC_8737
Just within one year this plants have grown that tall. The secret is they are behind a cow stall, so the poop really helps the plants to grow
DSC_8725
I met the local priest who divides up the harvest between the different families of a town

DSC_8812

 

From Khartoum to the Ethiopian border, my final days in Sudan

img_5782
When I had my first flat tire, after 5,500 km

From Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, I still had around 550km to go towards the border of Ethiopia. I decided to take a little D-Tour to stay away from the busy main road. I was just tired of main roads. During the three days from Atbara to Khartoum I faced death several times. Bus and truck drivers wouldn’t stop behind me when some other vehicle was coming towards me. While passing, they just pushed me off the road and I sometimes was close to fall of my bicycle. I started to literally do a hand sign every time a truck was approaching me from behind, showing them to “get the fuck over”. It worked most of the time and I was just really happy to finally reach Khartoum. So, the road I took towards Al Quadrif was on the other side of the Nile and I found it to be very peaceful and with barely any traffic. 

DSC_7760

DSC_7906
After unusual heavy rains a lot of town were flooded
DSC_7804
That is how a usual village looks like
DSC_7742
For kilometres there was nothing, and suddenly a house shows up again… Imagine living here, seriously in the nowhere

DSC_7801DSC_7797

img_5598
Best way to spend your 3h lunch break, I was lucky this time

The environment started to change quickly. The closer I got to the border, the greener it became. I planned to split the 550km into 5 days, staying in “Hotels” in the bigger cities of Wad Madani and Al Quadrif, and the rest of the days I would sleep somewhere along the road. As you can see in the pictures I found some beautiful camping spots, all by myself, covered by trees. Even though some locals noticed me, I have never felt unsafe in any way while wild camping in Sudan. During my 23 days in Sudan, I only spent 50 dollars on accommodation, so I most of the time slept in my tent. The hotels I had were filthy and really just good for the night to stock up on water and food. In Sudan I paid around 4 to 5 dollars on average for a room per night. When I sleep in a hotel I would always take my bike inside the room. Sometimes, I can barely move within my own room but at least I know the bike is safe. There are for sure more expensive rooms I could take, but what’s the point, I’d rather use that money for other activities than for sleep, and the funny things happen when you get out of your comfort zone. Waking up having a rat in your room or having diarrhea all night long when the bathroom is 100 meters away from where you sleep are stories you won’t forget that quickly.

DSC_8090
Nicely covered from the street, and finally some good solid ground again to pitch my tent

DSC_7959

img_5756
Always in use, my camping chair!

 

Population density increased

The life along the road became busier as I moved on. The agricultural sector is more dominant in the east of Sudan compared to the rest of the route I have followed. The landscape is very green and there are a lot of animals grazing all around. On one day between Khartoum and Wad Madani there were people everywhere, town after town so I decided to stay at a police checkpoint one night. They are safe and the Police men in Sudan surprisingly don’t even carry a gun. They offered me a lot of hot milk and other food.

img_5605
Night at a police station
DSC_8080
The usual daily traffic
DSC_8070
I love how that donkey has its tongue out, haha heavy women:P

DSC_8055DSC_8039

DSC_7916

Sudanese hospitality

The hospitality continued throughout my travel through Sudan. On an hourly basis people invited me for coffee and tea, which I most of the times frankly declined since I had to do some kilometres, and I cannot drink tea all day long. However, I never turned down a food offer, haha, so I randomly was invited by a young guy while I was doing a water break. I first thought he wanted something from me, but as I had already done more than 3/4 of my planned route on that day I just followed him. Since it was Friday (the Muslims holy day), I got invited to a huge breakfast which was just delicious. There were only guys in the room, ranging from the age of 5 up to 27. One guy was fluent in English and it felt good to have a normal conversation. After discussing a lot of cultural differences between Sudan and Switzerland, he kindly asked me to take off my clothes, they wanted to see me naked. I just laughed and showed them my upper body. I laughed even more when they wanted to see more, but I then frankly declined, and they accepted it. Later, I asked myself why they wanted to see me totally naked, is it because of the skin colour? or did they want to see if my penis is circumcised? I really don’t know, I just thought it was funny that they were totally against homosexuality and then asking me to take off my clothes in front of them.

img_5619
Typical sudanese breakfast
img_5626
The guys who invited me for breakfast

The African way

I just love spending time in a village or city, sitting somewhere and watch the people doing their daily business. There are special phone charging places where around 50 phones are being charged at the same time. In Africa, more people have access to Internet than to electricity. What I also realized is that people in Sudan really don’t do maintenance on their equipment. The trucks, buses, tuctuc’s whatever you name it, they just use it until it does not work anymore. Seriously they have no profile on their tire anymore, they won’t exchange a tire until it explodes and is completely ripped off the rim, sometimes causing even further damage to the body of the vehicle. In this part I will post some pictures that are so typical to the African way of doing things.

DSC_7972
Donkeys are the main mean of transportation in the rural areas

DSC_8010

DSC_8079
A usual sight in Africa, trucks filled with people, safety is never an issue
img_5649
They are really keen on keeping their vehicle clean, just the place they do it is a bit….
DSC_7889
TucTuc cleaning
img_5690
Every day I get surprised by things, like this wardrobe in my room
img_5698
Sudanese “Handy-Doctor”
img_5715
Exploded tires everywhere, and the spare tires they usually have are as run down as all the others
img_5726
A typical sight you can see all over, women walking for kilometers to transport things

 

The Ethiopian Visa

As I did not enter Ethiopia by airplane, I was obliged to get the Visa at the Ethiopian Embassy in Khartoum. I arrived in Khartoum on a Friday, and as the arabic weekend is from Friday to Saturday, I had to wait until Sunday to go to the Embassy. A friend told me to go there very very early. The embassy opens at 8:30 and I arrived there at 06:00AM. Surprisingly, I was not the first one, as I had to register at the “security guard” I was assigned with the number 47. The whole process was so disorganized and no one really had a clue what was going on. There were around 4 different lines, everyone was shouting, holding different papers in their hand and the embassy people in charge of letting people in, made use of their situational power and acted in a really arrogant way. Apparently, the first ones they let in already came to the embassy 5 days before, and as they only let in 100 people per day, the whole process was totally delayed. At 11:00 a guy finally made clear to us that there is no way we would get a visa today, and he put on each of our visa forms a number again and a date, when we will have our visa appointment. I was assigned with number one on Wednesday. So I had to wait three days to go to the embassy again. As I had time and really wanted the Visa, I arrived again at 06:00 on that Wednesday. At around 10:00 I was allowed to go inside, and I was really lucky, as the number I was assigned to earlier did not matter at all. There were people who even had an appointment 2 days before me and again didn’t manage to be let inside. The whole process is just soooo disorganized, and as an embassy worker, how can you deal with that every day without changing it? I had to wait another 6 hours inside until I finally got my three months visa, which cost me 60$.

My struggle with the postcards

On my whole way down in Sudan I tried to find a Post office, but the answer was always no, there is none in Sudan. I asked people everywhere and even expats, living in Khartoum for years told me they have not heard of a post office anywhere. As I checked maps.me, there was a sign saying Post office Khartoum. Well, why not give it a try? Since I write a postcard for every donation I receive, and most people wanted a postcard from Sudan, I had to try it. I didn’t want to let 20 people down, haha! As I arrived at the location, yes there was a big building, looking like a post office, but a guy told me that is a remaining building from the British colonial period. Ok well, so I just started asking around the locals where to find a post office. As usual, no one had a clue, but suddenly one guy seemed to know what I am looking for, stopped a minibus and told the driver where to drop me off. Tadaaa, after a short walk I really arrived at something that looked like a Post office. The mess inside was terrific but it still looked like they were under control of the mess. I checked if they send postcards as well as the price. So, I finally found a post office, but what about postcards? Sudan is not a typical tourist destination, so where do you find postcards? The struggle was real! I already made plans to print out pictures and send them inside an envelope. As I walked out of the SudaPost office, a guy with a little street shop, looked at me and said: postcards?! I couldn’t hold back my laugh, I was like damn, you are my mannnn!! The postcards he had were at least 20 years old but in my opinion they were great, even though they did not look nice at all, they are postcards from Sudan! I mean who has ever received a postcard from Sudan?! What a game changer, I managed to find a post office as well as postcards! As I brought all of them to the postoffice, I really made sure to get the women at the counter on my side. I wouldn’t call it flirting, but as I told them all those cards are for my wife, kids and friends, their heart really seemed to melt and I was pretty sure that they will take good care of the cards. I put all the postage stamps on each card my self and stamped them myself, to make sure that they don’t just take the postage stamps off again after I leave. It took exactly 18 days until the first postcards arrived, and I believe that by now, all the 20 cards have found their way to the recipient. How great is that? It took 6 weeks for postcards from Italy to arrive home, which were sent 200km off the Swiss border! Shout out to SudaPost!!!

img_5560
The big day at the postoffice
img_5559
My man!! Hey you want postcards??!!

img_5570

Sudan – Ethiopia border crossing

Border crossings are exciting, you are entering a new country, a different culture. They speak a different language, dress differently. Just from one day to the next, things can completely change. Nevertheless, border crossings are also a big hassle. People always try to take advantage of you, they want to exchange your money, try to charge you more on food, try to help you getting money from an ATM, telling you where to go and there is like 10 people shouting at you if you go somewhere else.

I camped 50 km away from the border between some trees. I took it easy in the morning because I knew I only had to do around 90 km with not a lot of altitude change. I rode for 2km when I suddenly realized that I had my first flat tire, wuhuu! After 5500 km, riding through thorn bushes, over glass shards and terrible roads, this is a solid achievement I would say. It took me around 30 minutes, as I was in no hurry and I rather did it slow and easy, than twice. I exchanged the tube and fixed the defective one a couple of days later in a hotel room, where it was not as dusty and full of dirt.

Once at the border, I had to go to the Sudanese immigration office to fill out a form, get my passport stamped and I was off to cross the bridge to the other side. The Sudanese officers at the border attempted to check my luggage. I acted like I did not understand what he wanted to do and after a couple of seconds he just waved me over. I then had to go through the exact same process on the other side. The lady who wanted to check my luggage was a bit more eager to see my stuff. She checked like the first two bags in front, but then got tired of it and I talked her out of it. Imagine, it is sooooo annoying if they want to look through your whole equipment. It’s so much and I need to take all the bags off the bike. Passport control is annoying too. Just normal dressed people showed up at the side of the rode demanding to see my passport. Yes, they could be police officers, and probably mostly are but as I cannot know it I usually just pass on without showing them anything. The mostly do not have a car so they couldn’t even follow me.

What does cycling mean to me?

Probably most accurately – Freedome… I can just go wherever I want, any kind of „road“, at any time. I don‘t need to worry about gasoline, stupid taxes, paperwork at borders or any speedcontrols (😂). There are days where I like it more, there are others when I am just glad that the day is over, but all in all after every day you feel you have accomplished something. You are a few kilometers closer to your final destination, climbed up a mountain, fixed 10 punctures, crossed a flooded riverbed, pushed your bike up a hill or through the sand (or both together) for hours…, there are so many moments to celebrate each day. Some of you probably think, how can he still like cycling? Seriously, I don‘t know, but I guess it is all those little things every day that make cycle-traveling so enjoyable!

img_5735

The kindness of strangers

Arriving at the border I had around 10$ in Sudanese pounds left. As usual I try to get rid of all my money before crossing the border, since changing it always leaves you worse off than getting it from an ATM. Many people told me it is no problem to get money from an ATM right after the border so I did not worry about money at all. As the luck was totally not on my side, the only ATM across the border was out of service and I was told 40km down the road in the next town there is an other international ATM. I left Metama right away since I could not stand the hassle that was going on. Shortly after I saw two overlanders coming at me with beautiful BMW 1200 GS and GSA. I put my hand out to signal them to stop. In these areas you don’t meet that many travelers on the road so it is always worth to have at least a quick chat. It turned out it was a Belgium couple on their honey moon, traveling from South Africa all the way back to Belgium. If there is a woman out there that wants a honey moon like that as well, please get in touch with me! They call themselves the Belgium Gravel Cats and you can follow their adventurous journey here. I told them about my bad luck at the border with the ATM, and with no hesitation they hand me over their remaining Birr, which was around 12$, and a SIM card for emergencies since the next telephone store is on Gondar, 200km away. With the total of 22$ worth of Birr (name of Ethiopian currency) it was possible for me to reach Gondar, where I could withdraw money again. I would have survived without their kind gesture, but it def. made my upcoming three days way more comfortable with less hassle. Thank you for that! The kindness of fellow travelers especially in areas where you don’t really meet a lot of overlanders is always remarkable and I really try to keep UP that spirit.

Screenshot 2018-10-07 17.17.33
The Belgian Gravel Cats

Sudan – Statistics

Kilometres cycled: 1774

Days spent: 23

Nights wild camping: 10

Cost for food: 124$

Cost for sleeping: 98$, including two nights for a total of 50$ (Birthday treat)

Average daily water consumption: 12-14 liters

Favorite food: Sudanese call it Sahan ful (a plate of beans) or ful masri (Egyptian beans). It is a vegetarian protein rich dish garnished with fresh onions, tomatoes, rocket leaves, feta cheese, boiled eggs and sesame oil. It caused the only tailwind I had in Sudan, haha.

ebf6324a-c6ea-4d21-9ce7-6b1e501d31d0
Really doesn’t look tasty, but, it’s SOOOO GOOD!

A German version will follow in the next couple of days.

 

Deutsche Version: Sudan! 1200 km durch die Sahara

img_5356-1

Hey Lukas, wenn du nach Kapstadt fährst, musst du nicht durch den Sudan radeln? Ja, das tue ich. Ohh…. ist der Sudan nicht ein supergefährliches Land? Ich bekam die Frage so oft gestellt. Es schien sehr seltsam, dass mir die Leute sagten, wie gefährlich der Sudan sei, aber selbst noch nie dort waren. Dies geschieht in so vielen Alltagssituationen, Menschen, die denken, dass sie alles wissen, nur weil sie die Nachrichten hören, Zeitschriften lesen oder noch besser; jemand anderes hat es ihnen gesagt….. Da meine Vorbereitungszeit ziemlich umfangreich war, etwa 1 Jahr, musste ich mir so viele “Nein-Sager” anhören. Lukas, du kannst es nicht, es ist zu gefährlich, zu heiß, zu sandig, zu instabil, zu was auch immer. Ich fühlte mich wie ein Anwalt, der sich ständig verteidigen musste. Also, was nun, ich bin im Sudan angekommen, bin im Sommer 1200 Kilometer durch die Sahara gefahren. Ich kann nicht sagen, dass es nicht hart war, oder dass ich keine langen Tage hatte, oder dass ich wegen der Stürme in der Nacht sehr gut schlief. Aber ich hatte die Zeit meines Lebens. Was für ein Gefühl, einfach da draußen zu sein, unabhängig von allem. Niemand hat eine Ahnung, wo zum Teufel du bist, es ist einfach ruhig, der Himmel und vor allem die Sterne waren einzigartig.  Atemberaubend, selbst für mich selbst. Darauf hatte ich schon immer gewartet, das wahre Abenteuer, meine Zeit Afrika zu entdecken, hat endlich begonnen!

img_4988img_5018img_5219

 

Sudan – Meine Ankunft

Sudan, bisher das gastfreundlichste Land, in dem ich je war. Stell dir vor, in den ersten 7 Tagen habe ich keinen einzigen Dollar für Essen ausgegeben…. fühlt sich sehr besonders an. Es ist verrückt, wie unterschiedlich die Menschen im Sudan im Vergleich zu Ägypten sind. Die Sudanesen sind viel entspannter. Jeden Tag werde ich mehrmals zu Kaffee, Tee und Essen eingeladen. Ich fühle mich wirklich gut, wenn ich durch den Sudan fahre. Alle Leute geben dir die Daumen hoch, sie feuern dich an und wollen deinen Aufenthalt so angenehm wie möglich gestalten. Einmal stand ich an einer Wasserstation und fragte einen Mann, wo das nächste Restaurant sei. Es dauerte 3 Minuten und ich saß in seinem Haus und aß zu Mittag. Die Menschen hier haben wirklich nichts, die Armutsrate ist hoch, aber dennoch scheint ihre Gastfreundschaft grenzenlos zu sein.

img_5065
Als ich sogar ein Bett für meine Mittagspause bekam
img_5110
Hier habe ich ein Gebetsteppich bekommen, um ein Mittagsschläfchen zu machen
img_5181
Kafe Pause mit Lastwagenfahrern
img_5391
Taman! ein sudanesischer Ausdruck für gut!

Ich kam am 27. August mit der Fähre in Whadi Halfa an. Ich verbrachte eine wunderbare Nacht auf dem Deck des Bootes und beobachtete die ganze Nacht den Vollmond. Der ganze Entladevorgang dauerte ewig, aber es war mir egal, ich habe so viel Zeit für alles, warum sollte ich mich selbst stressen? Ich musste dem Zollbeamten jeden einzelnen Beutel zeigen, sie überprüften ihn, gingen aber wirklich nicht tief. Es hat einfach ewig gedauert, und ich hasse es, mein ganzes Fahrrad mit so vielen geladenen Sachen auszupacken. Es ist, als ob mir 6 Arme fehlen, um all die Dinge zu tun, die ich auf einmal tun muss. Aufgrund politischer Sanktionen funktioniert im Sudan keine ausländische Kreditkarte. Reisende wissen, dass sie immer genug Dollar dabeihaben müssen. Die Situation im Sudan ist etwas Besonderes. Um Geld zu tauschen, muss man es auf dem Schwarzmarkt tun, da der offizielle Kurs 7-mal niedriger ist. Im Moment ist die Rate ziemlich gut, sie liegt bei 1 zu 40. Stell dir vor, die grösste Note sind nur 50 sudanesische Pfund. Das Wechseln von 100 Dollar gibt dir einen riesigen Stapel von Noten, die nicht in eine normale Brieftasche passen. Es ist illegal, seine Dollar auf dem Schwarzmarkt zu tauschen. Ich meine, es ist offensichtlich, deshalb nennt man es überhaupt Schwarzmarkt, aber trotzdem macht es jeder. Die Leute werden dich auf dem Boot fragen, nachdem du durch den Zoll gekommen bist, oder du gehst einfach in zufällige Geschäfte in der Stadt, durch eine Hintertür und ein alter Mann wird dort mit einem Stapel Geldnoten sitzen und er wird auch deine Dollar wechseln. Der Kurs ändert sich täglich, so dass Verhandlungen möglich sind.

img_5447
dieses Bündel ist 40 Dollar wert 😀

Einige von euch mögen sich fragen, wie ich ein Visum für den Sudan bekommen habe. Es ist super einfach. Ich habe an die sudanesische Botschaft in Genf geschrieben: Hey, ich werde von Zürich nach Kapstadt radeln und muss durch den Sudan fahren, kann ich ein Visum bekommen? Ja, schicken Sie mir einfach Ihren Reisepass und 100$, Sie erhalten ihn innerhalb von 4 Tagen zurück. Großartig gearbeitet, perfekter Service! Ich habe ein Visum bekommen, das mir 2 Monate für die Einreise und 2 Monate für den Aufenthalt im Land gib, das bietet mir viel Flexibilität.

Der Sudan hat besondere Vorschriften für das Fotografieren. Tatsächlich ist es nur eine Regel: Du darfst überhaupt keine Fotos machen. Die Leute lieben es, wenn man sie fotografiert, sie werfen sich sogar in Pose, aber die Regierung will einfach nicht, dass man irgendwelche Fotos von einigen Infrastruktursachen macht. Ich kam nur einmal in Schwierigkeiten. In Karima, wo ein Typ ziemlich wütend wurde, weil ich in der Innenstadt herumgelaufen bin und Fotos gemacht habe. Haha, ich habe mich entschuldigt, und es war wieder gut.

img_5362
Seine Pose, es war nicht kalt, hatte bestimmt noch 40 Grad 

Nachdem ich eine lokale SIM-Karte bekommen, mein Geld gewechselt und für die nächsten 4 Tage Essen und Wasser gekauft hatte, bin ich am Nachmittag zu meiner ersten Nacht in der Wüste aufgebrochen.

Mein Weg nach unten

Da ich vor meinem Geburtstag nur 12 Tage Zeit hatte, um Khartum, die Hauptstadt des Sudans, zu erreichen, hatte ich einen engen Zeitplan. 12 Tage Radfahren klingt hart, aber der Körper gewöhnt sich überraschend schnell daran. Von den 11 Nächten, die ich dreimal in einem schmutzigen Hotel geschlafen habe, lagen die Kosten pro Nacht bei etwa 4-6$, also habe ich nicht viel erwartet, was ich nie tue. Wenn du geringe Erwartungen hast, kannst du nicht enttäuscht werden. Ich schlafe lieber in der Natur als an Orten, an denen man nicht weiß, wann die Bettwäsche zum letzten Mal gewaschen wurde. Sind es vielleicht 5 Monate, oder eher 10? Es ist besser, diese Dinge nicht zu wissen, schätze ich. Das Einzige, worum ich mich wirklich kümmere, ist, dass ich immer genügend Essen, für mindestens 3 Tage, mit mir habe und genug Wasser für einen ganzen Tag, das sind etwa 12-14 Liter. Mehr Wasser zu transportieren wird einfach zu schwer. Entlang des Nils gibt es mindestens alle 50 km eine Wasserstation. Das Wasser hat die unterschiedlichsten Farben, von hell über dunkelbraun bis grau, jede gewünschte Farbe ist möglich. Ich habe immer versucht, das Wasser zu filtern. Manchmal, wenn mir ein LKW-Fahrer eine eiskalte Flasche Wasser übergab, war ich zu faul, um es zu filtern. Am Nachmittag gegen 14:00 Uhr fing ich immer an, Lkw-Fahrer mit einer leeren Flasche Wasser zu winken. Im Ernst, 95% hielten immer an und übergaben mir Wasser, meistens kalt, manchmal gefroren oder wenn ich Glück hatte, sogar eine kalte Coca Cola. Wenn du in den letzten Stunden nur heißes Wasser hattest und dir jemand eine eiskalte Cola gibt, fühlst du dich wie im Himmel. Die nächste Stunde wird dann einfach umso angenehmer. Ich stand normalerweise um 4:30 Uhr auf, manchmal um 5, wenn ich mich noch nicht ruhig fühlte. Die Sonne geht um 5:15 Uhr auf und danach wird es schnell heiß. Normalerweise machte ich von 11 bis 14:30 Uhr eine Pause, weil es einfach zu heiß war und es eine massive Verschwendung von wertvollem Wasser gewesen wäre. Es war jedoch nicht immer einfach, einen guten Schlafplatz zu finden.  Ich begann gegen 16:30 Uhr nach einer schönen Düne zu suchen, um hinter mir zu lagern, was mir 1,5 Stunden Zeit gab, um zu kochen, das Zelt aufzustellen und alles wieder wegzuräumen. Ich hatte kaum Internet auf dem Weg nach Atbara. Ich habe es wirklich genossen und es war schön, einfach in meinem Buch zu lesen.

img_5154
Nicht der beste Schattenplatz den ich je hatte…
img_5173
Eiskaltes Wasser das ich gerade von einem Lastwagenfahrer bekommen habe

img_5183

img_5359
Ich hatte glück mit dieser Unterkunft, viel Schatten, ein Bett und niemand da
img_5126
Es hatte zu viel Wind um zu kochen, darum habe ich mich entschieden in dieser Ruine zu übernachten. Ich wusste natürlich da noch nicht dass es sehr sehr warm bleibt auch während der Nacht, da die Beton Mauern sehr  viel Hitze speichern 😀
img_5120
Dieses Skorpion fand ich an einem Morgen unter meinem Zelzt
img_5118
Unglaublich viele tite Kühe sind am Strassenrand anzutreffen. Der Geruch ist einzigartig…
img_5222
Schlafplatz
img_5233
Pyramieden von Karima
img_5122
Wasserstelle

Die Sandstürme und ich

Die ersten vier Nächte waren erstaunlich, es wehte eine Brise, ich stellte nur das Innenzelt auf, damit ich die Sterne sehen konnte. Danach wurde fast jede Nacht zu einem kleinen Alptraum. Als ich um 20:00 Uhr ins Bett ging, sah der Himmel immer völlig klar aus, aber gegen 23:00 Uhr begannen starke Winde aufzuziehen und ich befand mich mitten in einem großen Sturm. Es ist kein angenehmes Gefühl, einfach nur mitten im Nirgendwo zu sein, allein, fast vom Wind weggeblasen zu werden, aber was kann man tun? Ich hatte keine Angst, ich hatte alles unter Kontrolle. Ich lag wie ein Seestern in meinem Zelt, so dass das Zelt nicht abheben konnte. Es ist generell schwierig, ein Zelt in der Wüste aufzuschlagen. Der Sand hält die Zeltpflöcke nicht. Normalerweise hatte ich gehofft, dass der Sturm verschwinden würde, sobald die Sonne aufgeht. Leider geschah dies nur einmal. Die anderen beiden Male musste ich alles unter extrem windigen Bedingungen zusammenpacken. Alles lief gut, ich fühlte es nur auf dem Fahrrad ein wenig, dass ich überhaupt nicht geschlafen hatte. In diesen 6 Tagen habe ich insgesamt 650 Kilometer bei konstantem Gegenwind zurückgelegt. Am schlimmsten Tag hatte ich in den ersten 4 Stunden durchschnittlich 10 km/h, was einen an einem 9 bis 10-stündigen Radtour Tag ziemlich müde macht. Im Allgemeinen fühlt sich der Körper gut an und ich kann wirklich Gas geben. Allerdings achte ich immer darauf, viel Salz und Magnesium zu mir zu nehmen. Meinen Körper gut zu behandeln, wenn ich ihn so stark fordere, ist wichtig.

img_5289
Es war ziemlich sandig

Mein Geburtstag, Alexander und viele Geschichten.

Es war etwas ganz Besonderes, meinen Geburtstag im Sudan zu feiern. Sicherlich etwas, das nicht viele Europäer für sich beanspruchen können. Nach dem Scharia-Gesetz ist Alkohol strengstens verboten. Also, ich schätze, ich werde mein Geburtstagsbier einmal in Äthiopien trinken müssen.

Zander kommt aus Großbritannien, lebt derzeit in Johannesburg und radelt von Südafrika bis Alexandria. Ich wäre gerne mit ihm gefahren, hoffentlich können wir das in Zukunft irgendwann einmal tun. Es ist nicht so, dass ich mich einsam fühle, es ist einfach cool, manchmal einen Kumpel mit dir zu haben, der Geschichten erzählt, mit dem du kochen kannst oder einfach nur durch den Gegenwind drücken. Zander entschied sich spontan, einen zusätzlichen Tag zu bleiben, nur um meinen Geburtstag mit mir zu feiern. Wir hatten tolles Essen und viele interessante Gespräche.

img_5443
Geburtstags Essen
img_5457
Als Alex morgens um 5:30 los fuhr

 

Frau im Sudan

Ich glaube, es gibt einen großen Unterschied zu den Frauen, die ich in Ägypten getroffen habe. Hier scheinen Frauen viel offener zu sein. Sie sagen Hallo, lächeln, schütteln den Männern die Hand und sind nicht so von der männlichen Welt getrennt, wie es in Ägypten der Fall zu sein schien. Sie tragen auch bunte Kleider, und ich kann dir sagen: Es sieht wunderschön aus! Ich habe noch kein Foto gemacht. Ich fühle mich dabei immer irgendwie touristisch.

Kommunikation

Die meisten Leute können kaum Englisch, mein Arabisch ist wirklich nicht gut, aber mit Händen und Füßen gelingt es mir immer, das zu bekommen, was ich will. Normalerweise, wenn ich meine Mittagspause mache, bin ich von jungen Leuten umgeben. Ich habe herausgefunden, dass die meisten von ihnen super fussballinteressiert sind, also macht es immer Spaß, Spieler zu benennen und zu vergleichen. Am meisten werde ich immer gefragt: Ronaldo oder Messi? Ronaldo natürlich 😉

Damit es ein wenig einfacher geht, habe ich den Blog mit einer elektronischen Hilfe übersetzt.

img_5340
Die Pyramieden von Meroe

img_5339

Übersetzt mit www.DeepL.com/Translator

Sudan! 1200 km through the Sahara

img_5356-1

Hey Lukas, when you ride to Cape Town, won’t you need to cycle through Sudan? Yes, I do. Ohh… isn’t Sudan a super dangerous country? I got the question asked so many times. It seemed very weird, people telling me how dangerous Sudan was, but they have never actually been there. This happens in so many everyday situations, people thinking they know everything, just from listening to the news, reading journals or even better; someone else told them… Since my preparation time was quite extensive, around 1 year, I had to listen to so many “No Sayers”. Lukas you can’t do it, it’s too dangerous, too hot, too sandy, too unstable, too whatever. I felt like a lawyer, constantly defending myself. So, what now, I have arrived in Sudan, cycled 1200 kilometres across the Sahara during summer. Can’t say it wasn’t tough, or that I didn’t have really long days, or that I slept very well because of the storms at night. However, I was having the time of my life. What an amazing feeling just to be out there, independent from anything. No one has any clue where the hell you are, it is just quiet, the sky and especially the stars were breath-taking.  Mind-blowing, even for myself. This is what I had always been waiting for, the real adventure, my time to discover Africa has finally started!

img_4988img_5018img_5219

Sudan – My arrival

Sudan, until now the most hospitable country I have been to. Imagine, for the first 7 days I did not spend a single dollar on food… feels very special. It is crazy how different the people in Sudan are compared to Egypt. Sudanese people are way more relaxed. Every day, I get invited several times for coffee, tea and food. I feel really great cycling through Sudan. All the people give you thumbs up, they cheer you on and just want to make your stay as enjoyable as possible. One time I was standing at a water station, asking a guy where the next restaurant was. It took 3 minutes and I was sitting in his house eating lunch. People here really don’t have anything, poverty rate is high, but still their hospitality seems to be boundless.

img_5065
They gave me a bed to relax during my lunch break
img_5110
Lunch break on a praying carpet, people really care for my rest 😀
img_5180
Morning Coffee with some Truckdrivers

img_5391

I arrived with the ferry in Whadi Halfa on August 27th. I spent a wonderful night on the deck of the boat, watching the full moon all night long. The whole unloading process took forever, but I didn’t care, I have so much time for whatever, why should I stress myself. I had to show every single bag to the customs officer, they checked it through, but really didn’t go deep. It just took forever, and I hate unpacking my whole bicycle with so many items loaded. It is like I am missing 6 arms to do all the things I have to do at once. Due to political sanctions, no foreign credit card works in Sudan. Travelers know, always carry enough Dollars with you. The situation in Sudan is kind of special. To exchange money, you must do it on the black market, since the official rate is like 7 times lower. Right now, the rate is quite good, it is 1 to 40. Imagine the highest bill is a 50 Sudanese Pound one. Changing 100 dollars gives you a huge pile of bills that don’t fit in a normal wallet. It is illegal to exchange your dollars on the black market. I mean it’s obvious, that’s why it’s called black market in the first place, but still everyone does it. People will ask you on the boat, after you get through customs, or you just go to random stores around town, through some backroom door and an old guy will be sitting there with piles of bills and he will change your dollars too. The rate changes on a daily basis, so bargaining is possible.

img_5447
This is worth 40 dollars

Some of you might ask yourselves, how did I get a Visa for Sudan? It is super easy. I just wrote to the Sudanese Embassy in Geneva; Hey, I will be cycling from Zurich to Cape-town and I need to pass through Sudan, can I get a Visa? Yes, just send me your passport and 100$, you will get it back within 4 days. Worked great, perfect service! I got a Visa that gave me 2 months to enter the country and 2 months to stay inside, this provides a lot of flexibility.

Sudan has special regulations on taking pictures. In fact, it is just one rule: you are not allowed to take any pictures at all. People love if you take pictures of them, they even throw themselves in pose, but the government just doesn’t want that you take any pictures of some infrastructure stuff. I only got into trouble once. In Karima, where one guy became kind of furious by me walking around downtown taking pictures. Haha, I apologized, and it was good again.

img_5362
Don’t worry, he wasn’t freezing, it was still around 40 degrees 

After getting a local SIM card, changing my money and buying food and water for the next 4 days, I took off in the afternoon for my first night in the desert.

My way down

Since I had only 12 days’ time to reach Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, before my birthday, I was on a tight schedule. Cycling for 12 days sounds rough, but your body gets surprisingly fast used to it. Out of the 11 nights I slept 3 times in a filthy hotel, costs per night were around 4-6$ so I did not expect much, something I never do. If you have low expectations, you cannot get disappointed. I rather sleep out in the nature than in places where you don’t know when the bedsheets were washed for the last time. Is it maybe 5 months, or rather 10? It’s better not to know those things I guess. The only thing I really take care of is that I always have enough food, for at least 3 days, with me and enough water for 1 full day, which is around 12-14 litres. Carrying more water just gets too heavy. Along the Nile you could find a water station at least every 50km. The water has the most diverse colours, from light to dark brown to grey, whatever colour you want you can find it. I always tried to filter the water. Sometimes when a truck driver handed me an ice-cold bottle of water I was too lazy to filter it. In the Afternoon at around 14:00 I always started to wave down truck drivers with an empty bottle of water. Seriously, 95% always stopped and handed me over water, mostly cold, sometimes frozen or when I got lucky even a cold Coca Cola. When you only had hot ass water for the last couple of hours and someone hands you an ice-cold Coke, you feel like you were in heaven. The next hour just becomes so much more pleasurable then. I usually got up at 4:30, sometimes 5 if I was not feeling it quiet yet. the Sun goes up at 5:15 and it is getting hot quickly after that. I usually took a break from 11 to 14:30, because it was just too hot, and it would have been a massive waste of valuable water. However, it was not always easy to find a good shade.  I started seeking for a nice dune to camp behind at around 16:30, which gave me 1.5 hour to cook, set up the tent, and to put everything away again. I barely had any internet on the way until Atbara. I really enjoyed it and it was nice to just read in my book. 

img_5154
Seeking shade… not the best lunch break I have had, It was just blazing hot and it didn’t really have a lot of shade
img_5173
One of the best moments, when I got two frozen water bottles in the middle of nowhere by some truck driver

img_5183

img_5359
It is rare that you find a place like this with a bed and no one around
img_5126
There was too much wind so I decided to sleep in this ruin… bad decision, it was  extremely hot all night long
img_5120
When I wanted to put away my tent, a scorpion suddenly rushed out from underneath my tent
img_5118
I really dont know why, but there are so many dead cows laying at the side of the rode
img_5222
Camping spot
img_5233
The Pyramids of Karima
img_5122
A waterstation

The Sandstorms and I 

The first four nights were amazing, there was a breeze going, I only had the inner tent pitched so that I could see the stars, and no clouds at all. Afterwards, almost every night became a little nightmare. When I went to sleep at 20:00, the sky always looked perfectly clear, but at around 23:00, strong winds started to pick up and I found myself in the middle of a big storm. It is not a pleasant feeling, just being out in the middle of nowhere, by yourself, almost blown away by the wind, but what can you do? I wasn’t scared, I had everything under control. I was laying in my tent like a starfish, so the tent could not take off. It is hard generally to pin down a tent in the desert. The sand doesn’t hold the tent pegs. I usually hoped the storm would go away once the sun goes up. Unfortunately, this happened only once. The other two times I had to pack everything together under extremely windy conditions. Everything went well, I just felt it on the bike a bit that I had not sleep at all. During those 6 days, I did a total of 650 kilometres with constant headwinds. On the worst day I had an average of 10 km/h during the first 4 hours, which makes you quite tired on a 9 to 10 hour cycling day. In general, body feels great and I can really push. However, I always check to eat a lot of salt and magnesium. Treating my body well if I am putting so much pressure on it is essential.

img_5289
Yes, it was quite sandy…

My birthday, Alexander and lots of stories

It felt quite special to celebrate my birthday in Sudan. Surely something not a lot of Europeans can claim for themselves. Due to Sharia law, alcohol is strictly prohibited. So, I guess I will have to drink my birthday beer once in Ethiopia.

Zander is from the UK, currently living in Johannesburg and cycling from South Africa all the way up to Alexandria. I would have loved to cycle with him, hopefully we will be able to do that in the future sometime. It is not that I feel lonely, it is just cool sometimes to have a buddy with you to share stories, cook together or just to push through the headwind. Zander spontaneously decided to stay an additional day just for celebrating my birthday with me. We had great food and lots of interesting talks.

img_5443
Birthday Dinner with Alexander
img_5457
When Alex left at 5:30 in the morning, heading towards Egypt

Woman in Sudan

I feel there is a huge difference to the women I met in Egypt. Here, women seem to be way more open. They say hello, smile, shake hands with men, and are not as separated from the male world as it seemed to be the case in Egypt. They also wear colourful dresses and I can tell you: It looks beautiful! I have not taken any picture yet. I always feel kind of touristy doing that. 

Communication

Most people barely know any English, my Arabic is really not good but with hands and feet I always manage to get what I want. Usually when I do my lunch break I am surrounded by young guys. I figured out most of them are super into football, so it’s always fun to just name players and compare them. Most favourite one I always get asked is: Ronaldo or Messi? Ronaldo of course 😉

img_5340

img_5339
The Pyramids of Meroe